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How can I determine if I am a resident of New York?

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Question
How can I determine if I am a resident of New York?

Answer

Resident

You are a New York State resident for income tax purposes if:

• Your domicile is not New York State but you maintain a permanent place of abode in New York State for more than 11 months of the year and spend 184 days or more (a part of a day is a day for this purpose) in New York State during the taxable year.

Note: If you maintain a permanent place of abode in New York State but are claiming to be a nonresident for tax purposes, you must be able to provide adequate records to substantiate that you did not spend more than 183 days of the tax year in New York State.

However, if you are a member of the armed forces, and your domicile is not New York State, you are not a resident under this definition. Also, if you are a military spouse domiciled in another state, but located in New York State solely to be with your spouse (who is a member of the armed services present in New York State in compliance with military orders), you are not considered a resident under this definition. For more information, see TSB-M-10(1)I, Military Spouses Residency Relief Act; or

• Your domicile is New York State. However, even if your domicile is New York, you are not a resident if you meet all three of the conditions in either Group A or Group B as follows:

Group A

1) You did not maintain any permanent place of abode in New York State during the taxable year; and

2) You maintained a permanent place of abode outside New York State during the entire taxable year; and

3) You spent 30 days or less (a part of a day is a day for this purpose) in New York State during the taxable year.

Group B

1) You were in a foreign country for at least 450 days (a part of a day is a day for this purpose) during any period of 548 consecutive days; and

2) You, your spouse (unless legally separated) and minor children spent 90 days or less (a part of a day is a day for this purpose) in New York State during this 548-day period; and

3) During the nonresident portion of the taxable year in which the 548‑day period begins, and during the nonresident portion of the taxable year in which the 548‑day period ends, you were present in New York State for no more than the number of days which bears the same ratio to 90 as the number of days in such portion of the taxable year bears to 548. The following formula illustrates this condition:

Number of days in the nonresident portion/548 × 90 = Maximum number of days allowed in New York State


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Article Details
Views: 742 Created on: Jun 15, 2013
Date updated: Dec 14, 2018
Posted in: States, New York

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