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Oklahoma Nonresident Spouse

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Question
How Do I File a Joint Tax Return if One of the Residents is an Oklahoma Nonresident Spouse?

Answer
The filing status for Oklahoma purposes is the same as on the Federal income tax return, with one exception. This exception applies to married taxpayers who file a joint Federal return where one spouse is a full-year Oklahoma resident (either civilian or military), and the other is a full-year nonresident civilian (non-military). In this case, the taxpayers must either:
 1. File as Oklahoma married filing separate. The Oklahoma resident, filing a joint Federal return with a nonresident civilian spouse, may file his/her Oklahoma return as married filing separate. The resident will file on Form 511 using the married filing separate rates and reporting only his/her income and deductions. If the nonresident civilian also has an Oklahoma filing requirement, he/she will file on Form 511NR, using married filing separate rates and reporting his/her income and deductions. Form 574 "Allocation of Income and Deductions" must be filed with the return(s). You can obtain this form by calling our forms request line at (405) 521-3108 or from our website at www.tax.ok.gov.
-OR-
2. File, as if both the resident and the nonresident civilian were Oklahoma residents, on Form 511. Use the "married filing joint" filing status, and report all income. A tax credit (Form 511TX) may be used to claim credit for taxes paid to another state, if applicable. A statement should be attached to the return stating the nonresident is filing as a resident for tax purposes only.
If an Oklahoma resident (either civilian or military) files a joint Federal return with a nonresident military spouse, they shall use the same filing status as on the Federal return. If they file a joint Federal return, they shall complete Form 511NR and include in the Oklahoma amount column, all Oklahoma source income of both the resident and the nonresident.

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Views: 402 Created on: Jun 15, 2013
Date updated: Nov 17, 2014

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