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Where do I enter my mortgage interest paid?

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Question
Where do I enter my mortgage interest paid?

Answer

A home mortgage is any loan that is secured by your main home or second home, regardless of how the loan is labeled. It includes first and second mortgages, home equity loans, and refinanced mortgages.

You can deduct home mortgage interest only if you meet all the following conditions.

You must file Form 1040 and itemize deductions on Schedule A (Form 1040).

You must be legally liable for the loan. You cannot deduct payments you make for someone else if you are not legally liable to make them. Both you and the lender must intend that the loan be repaid. In addition, there must be a true debtor-creditor relationship between you and the lender.

The mortgage must be a secured debt on a qualified home.

Select the Deductions and Credits tab then select itemized deductions.  Select START under the heading "Interest You Paid".  If you received the 1098 Mortgage interest statement, make the entry in the first entry box.

Limits on home mortgage interest. Your deduction for home mortgage interest is subject to a number of limits. If one or more of the following limits applies, see Pub. 936 to figure your deduction.

Limit for loan proceeds not used to buy, build, or substantially improve your home. You can only deduct home mortgage interest to the extent that the loan proceeds from your home mortgage are used to buy, build, or substantially improve the home securing the loan ("qualifying debt"). Make sure to check the box on line 8 if you had one or more home mortgages in 2018 with an outstanding balance and you didn't use all of the loan proceeds to buy, build, or substantially improve the home. The only exception to this limit is for loans taken out on or before October 13, 1987; the loan proceeds for these loans are treated as having been used to buy, build, or substantially improve the home. See Pub. 936 for more information about loans taken out on or before October 13, 1987. See Pub. 936 to figure your deduction if you must check the box on line 8.

Limit on loans taken out on or before December 15, 2017. For qualifying debt taken out on or before December 15, 2017, you can only deduct home mortgage interest on up to $1,000,000 ($500,000 if you are married filing separately) of that debt. The only exception is for loans taken out on or before October 13, 1987; see Pub. 936 for more information about loans taken out on or before October 13, 1987. See Pub. 936 to figure your deduction if you have loans taken out on or before December 15, 2017, that exceed $1,000,000 ($500,000 if you are married filing separately).

Limit on loans taken out after December 15, 2017. For qualifying debt taken out after December 15, 2017, you can only deduct home mortgage interest on up to $750,000 ($375,000 if you are married filing separately) of that debt. If you also have qualifying debt subject to the $1,000,000 limitation discussed under Limit on loans taken out on or before December 15, 2017, earlier, the $750,000 limit for debt taken out on or after December 15, 2017, is reduced by the amount of your qualifying debt subject to the $1,000,000 limit. An exception exists for certain loans taken out after December 15, 2017, but before April 1, 2018. If the exception applies, your loan may be treated in the same manner as a loan taken out on or before December 15, 2017; see Pub. 936 for more information about this exception. See Pub. 936 to figure your deduction if you have loans taken out after October 13, 1987, that exceed $750,000 ($375,000 if you are married filing separately).

Limit when loans exceed the fair market value of the home. If the total amount of all mortgages is more than the fair market value of the home, see Pub. 936 to figure your deduction.


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Views: 3237 Created on: Jun 15, 2013
Date updated: Dec 12, 2018

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